Your Vacation Rx, Part 1: Formulate a Plan

 
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What is linked to reduced risk of coronary heart disease, decreased anxiety, and higher job satisfaction, yet 40% of employees take zero to 25% of what is available to them?

Vacation days.

If you’ve got them, use them--for the sake of your health, research says.

The various health benefits of vacation last different lengths of time upon returning to work, but if you’re nervous about taking time off, consider a respite’s impact on work absenteeism: Odds are that you’ll be less likely to call in sick to work for the month following your vacation.

You don’t need to go on a yoga retreat to design your vacation in a way that can boost your health. Taking time off can be a valuable tool in your wellness toolbox and to use vacation days in the most health-promoting way possible, there are some things you may want to keep in mind when strategizing your time away.

Pull up your Google Calendar or grab your pencil and planner and start implementing your solid vacation strategy!

How Often?:

Since the wellbeing effect of your vacation starts to lapse pretty soon after your return to the office and that you’ll be back at your prior level of wellbeing within one to four weeks, researchers suggest that breaking up your vacation time may be better for you than taking it all at once each year.

How Long?:

Studies show that your health and wellbeing increase quickly after vacation starts and peak 8 days into the vacation, so you may not squeeze all the health benefits you can out of your vacation if you take a shorter break. However, the research seems to indicate that no matter the length of vacation, the benefits you’ll get from the time off will start to decrease after your last day,

Where To?:

Warmer, sunnier locales are ideal if recuperation is your goal, research indicates. And for all of the stressed types out there counting down the days until vacation, take heart: The more work strain you experience before your departure, the greater benefit you’ll experience if you’re able to really get away and unplug.

Consider time zones too, as the greater the number of hours are between your home and vacation time zones, the more exhaustive effect it is likely to have.

On Monday, check back here on the Primary blog for your next step in setting up the vacation you need to feel your best: building your itinerary (or lack thereof!).