Posts in nutrition
You work best when you... drink celery juice?
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Celery Juice; the latest wellness trend that everyone is talking about and instagram’s most recent phenomenon. I’m sure one way or another you have heard about it or perhaps you have succumbed to social media peer pressure and have already tried it for yourself?

So why is this ‘magic juice’ so popular and what is it all about? Its recommended usage is that you should have one 16oz glass of celery juice every morning on an empty stomach, even before you’ve drank any water, and wait around 30 minutes before eating breakfast.  

The health benefits are endless, according to the Medical Medium (whom I first heard about celery juice through on instagram) and there are so many incredible healing stories out there. The Medical Medium shares a lot of ‘before and after’ transformations on his instagram page and some of them really are mind-blowing. The benefits of incorporating celery juice into your diet include clearer skin, improved digestion, less bloating, sustained energy, better mental clarity, weight loss, and more stable moods.

Two of the benefits above really jumped out at me. Would you like to have better mental clarity and sustained energy on a daily basis? I certainly do - just tell me how!

Also, many of you reading this will probably agree that having a more stable mood is always a huge positive. We all have our down days or days where we feel like we really just can’t be bothered (the word ‘hormones’ may spring to mind!). But, it’s how we uplift ourselves to deal with these feelings and get that glow back that’s important, and a glass of celery juice every morning may be the answer you’re looking for!

Sustained energy and better mental clarity are pivotal in ensuring your working day is as healthy and productive as it possibly can be. There are lots of fancy words and meanings to describe how drinking this juice can help our bodies, but we will keep it nice and simple (for those of you that are familiar with biology jargon and want to understand in more depth, read some more here).

Simply put, celery is a major alkaline food which helps to clear the body of acid and toxins as well as cleansing the liver and bloodstream. It is also extremely hydrating and restores the entire digestive system. By doing this, it puts our hearts and minds at ease and has a significant calming effect on our bodies, in turn having a huge positive effect on how we go about our day-to-day lives.

It’s also important to note that drinking celery juice should come hand-in-hand with a healthy lifestyle and fairly nutritious diet. In other words, please don’t have a 16oz glass every morning and expect to see benefits if you eat junk food all day long! In an ideal world, eating pizza every day is the dream, but unfortunately you’re unlikely to see the real benefits of celery juice if you do this.

I can vouch for the fact that it actually DOES work. I suffer with fairly bad psoriasis and after having celery juice every morning for only 2 weeks, I started to notice a big difference (I was truly amazed!!). However, please be aware that our bodies work in different (and mysterious) ways and it may not necessarily work in the same way for everyone. That said, it’s always reassuring to know someone who has tried it and has seen results first-hand. I also felt so much more energized throughout the day having had a glass in the morning - so much so that I significantly cut down my daily coffee intake (yes, really!).

Everyone at Primary knows you work best when you feel great, and you feel great when you drink celery juice, so… you do the math!

Side note - if I have inspired you to get on the celery juice hype (I won’t be offended if not), you will need a juicer to get started. Here’s some research of a good recommendation for you all, reasonably priced and easy to clean with most parts being dishwasher safe too.

Happy juicing!

Down Dog for Digestion
 
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The next time your stomach is bothering you, you may want to reach for your yoga mat.

Research shows that yoga can help boost your digestive system, not only for people with occasional issues, but also for people with more chronic ailments, like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

It’s not just that when you twist your torso your yoga teacher says you’re “detoxing” your system. Yoga affects your digestion in more ways than one.

If your digestion is slow, performing yoga poses can increase your blood circulation, while also giving an internal massage to the muscles around your digestive system. This can help get your system back up and moving again.

A yoga practice can mean you get more out of the foods you eat, as results from a study out of India suggested that it can aid the body in nutrient absorption.

Put It Into Practice:

A twice-weekly Iyengar yoga practice helped patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by alleviating their symptoms.

To get the biggest digestive benefit each time you do yoga, make sure to engage your core with every pose, which also massages, contracts, and stretches the organs responsible for your digestive system. When you stretch in certain ways you create more space for your organs to function.

Also be sure to focus on your breath. Abdominal breathing can aid your digestive system.

How to Power Your Practice:

If you’re going to a class, try to eat one to two hours before hitting the mat. If you’re working with this timeframe, opt for choices that have complex carbohydrates, protein, and fats--yoga teacher and nutritionist Jennifer Vagios, RD suggests cooking ¼ cup of eats and topping it with walnuts and plain Greek yogurt.

If you are rushing from the office and only get a chance to eat 15 minutes in advance, have something with easily digestible natural sugars and a bit of fat and protein, she says, citing a smoothie made with a date, ½ frozen banana, 1 cup of unsweetened almond milk, and cinnamon as a good choice for this situation.

So, there you have it--the next time you hear your stomach rumble, take it to the mat.

By Hannah Woit

 
Select Sprouts for a Nutritional Boost
 
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There are so many terms popping up on food labels it can be hard to know how to make sense of it all - organic, biodynamic, heirloom, natural… What is worth the extra money?

One term that might be worth looking out for? “Sprouted.”

Sprouting refers to when the seed has just begun to grow, before it becomes a plant.

Why Sprout:

When the sprout begins to germinate, the seed breaks down starch, which increases nutrient levels.

This process also breaks down chemicals that can lessen bioavailability, which translates into how well your body absorbs the other nutrients present in the food. In grains, this means that your body will benefit from more vitamins such as folate, iron, vitamin C, zinc, magnesium, and protein. You’ll be getting more nutrients in less food.

Since germination also lessens the amount of starch in the food, it can make sprouted grains easier to digest, which can be especially helpful for those who sometimes have issues digesting grains.

Sprout Safely:

There are a couple of caveats to keep in mind with regards to sprouted foods. First, be mindful of bacteria. Sprouts can be contaminated by harmful bacteria such as E. coli. Buy your fresh sprouts from somewhere you trust. Also, be sure to enjoy your sprouted foods sooner rather than later--within two or three days. If you’re bringing them to work, be sure to put them in the office fridge when you get in--sprouts and sprouted products should generally be kept in the refrigerator.

If you want to be super careful, use sprouts in cooked foods. Kristina Secinaro, a registered dietician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, suggests incorporating them into your baked goods, by grounding sprouts into a paste that you can add to your recipe. You can also cook the raw sprouts as part of a dish. The cooking process can kill that potentially harmful bacteria.

Sprout On:

Sprouting is something you can do in your own kitchen to save money and be in control of the process to make sure it is done safely. Try this recipe from The Kitchn for sprouted grains. If you’re interested in branching out from grains, you can use this guide to see how long it takes to sprout different legumes and grains.

If you don’t want to DIY, Secarino suggests checking nutrition labels to find the healthiest sprouted products, since some have only a little bit of sprouted ingredients, but many preservatives.

So, the next time you're getting groceries, keep an eye out for those sprouts!

 
Biotics on the Brain
 
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By Hannah Woit

Have food on your mind? Ever make a decision based on a “gut feeling”?

Sure, you may be thinking about how long until you can dig into your office lunch or feel butterflies in your stomach before making a big decision, but your food is also on your mind in another sense.

More and more information is coming to light regarding how what you eat and what is in your gut can impact your brain.

How? The answer gets back to our recent topic of the microbiome and the importance of having both prebiotics and probiotics in your diet.

According to researchers, probiotics release a type of acid, called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) associated with reduced anxiety and gut microorganisms may affect the impulses that reach your cerebral cortex--and all of this may influence your behavior.

These microorganisms in your gut have been termed “psychobiotics”.

Different types of bacteria can:

  • Help moderate the levels of harmful bacteria in your gut

  • On a hormonal level, stop the cortisol and adrenaline response that can be hazardous to your health

  • Help turn off chronic stress responses via the immune system

Plus, your gut actually contains neurons, in the form of your enteric nervous system which controls your digestion. Some in the field have started referring to this system as your “second brain”.

So, what does this mean for you? Think about reaching for:

Dark chocolate can boost the levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in your gut because the polyphenols in chocolate, as a prebiotic, can help them thrive.

Yogurt often has Lactobacillus acidophilus, which helps your spinal cord’s cannabinoid receptors, which are associated with your ability to regulate pain.

Probiotic shots, such as Pure Green’s Blue Biotic Shot, a new addition to Primary’s cafe menu. It is a potent combination of probiotics, blue algae, ginger, lemon, manuka honey, and filtered water.

 
Two Elements You Need for a Healthy, Happy Gut: Probiotics and Prebiotics
 
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By Hannah Woit

The past few years have seen a shift from an emphasis on harsh antibacterial soaps, sterile environments, and antibiotics to an appreciation of bacteria in protecting our health.

This is due to research on the microbiome--the colony of bacteria in bodies. Researchers have found that the mix of bacteria is important in promoting health, especially in our gut. Our gut microbiota help our bodies process indigestible substances and the medicines and pollution from our world that we ingest.

The development of our microbiome begins even before birth and continues throughout our lifetime. And, despite the relatively higher access to technology and advanced healthcare in general in cities, those who live in more rural areas tend to have a better mix in their microbiome. Other factors determining our gut health include our diet, genetics, culture, age, lifestyle, and history of medication usage.

In addition to a healthy microbiome helping our digestion in general, research reported in Nature demonstrated that gut microbes in obese versus lean individuals differ. Researchers reported finding that when the obese people lost weight, their microbial profile started to look more closely to that of the leaner people, which may be due to the fact that high-fiber diets tend to contain less fat and calories, while also helping people feel more full and lose weight.

So, what to do?

One way to promote our gut health is to focus on incorporating probiotics and prebiotics into our diet. Probiotics and prebiotics both alter our microbiome composition and help keep our digestion revving efficiently.

Here are the basics:

Probiotics:

Probiotics are health-promoting bacteria. They help maintain a healthy digestion, which means they can reduce the frequency of constipation, cramping, and other digestive annoyances. They also help your body combat inflammation associated with inflammatory disease and tackle infections like the common cold and flu and other illnesses.

In terms of nutrition, if you’re already making an effort to eat healthy, you can help maximize the health benefits of the nutritious food you’re eating by working on your gut health. Probiotics help your body use the nutrients in your food more effectively.

Where to get them: 

As we’ve previously mentioned on the blog, we have probiotics stocked for you at Primary, including Revive kombucha or Maple Hill yogurt. Other sources of probiotics include tempeh and cultured non-dairy yogurt.

 

Prebiotics:

Prebiotics are probiotics’ best friend. Probiotics have gained more attention in recent years, but prebiotics help probiotics survive and thrive.

Prebiotics are most commonly fibers found in the ingredients in our food that our body can’t digest. However, the probiotics we want in our gut thrive off of prebiotics.

Where to get them:

Get your prebiotic fix by incorporating onions, asparagus, artichokes, or soybeans into your diet, or stash bananas or whole-wheat snacks at the office.

 
Snack Smarter
 
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By Hannah Woit

, on average, Americans spend close to 100,000 hours on work-related activities. Yeah, you’ll be needing snacks.

If you are looking to optimize your productivity, reach for a brain-boosting snack to satiate your hunger while giving your brain the fuel it needs. For extra credit, stock snacks at the office that include these 3 nutrients:

1. Probiotics:

As Scientific American put it, “Mental health may depend on creatures in the gut.” Early research indicates that probiotics may lessen symptoms of depression by increasing serotonin and/or decreasing the amount of proteins that indicate inflammation.

Sources: If you’re at Primary, you can score your probiotics by trying a kombucha (Primary serves Revive), a grapeshot juice from Pure Green, or Maple Hill yogurt. Kefir is also great, but if dairy isn’t your thing, other fermented foods, such as certain kimchi and sauerkraut, can also be good options!

2. Turmeric:

The curcumin in turmeric is an antioxidant powerhouse that may protect your brain from cell damage. In ayurvedic tradition, it is used for multiple ailments, including fatigue.

Sources: Like probiotics, turmeric is available as a dietary supplement, but you can also buy this super spice on the shelf of your local supermarket and use it as a savory seasoning atop snacks like popcorn or grab a turmeric latte.

3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids:

Omega-3s have been shown to lessen cognitive decline in the elderly. Research has also indicated that they may help with depression. Other studies have suggested that they can also combat inflammation.

Sources: Fish can be a great source for omega-3s, but for snacks, good bets are adding chia or flax seeds to a yogurt or, at Primary, a snack with olive oil, like a Crack of Dawn bar from Early Bird, a Brooklyn-based company.